Tag: IQ

Response to Richardson and Norgate (2015): "Does IQ Really Predict Job Performance?"

Ken Richardson is a figure in the psychometric world who has made some pretty bold claims about g, heritability, and IQ testing as a whole. Out of his many (flawed) works, there is one in particular I wished to respond to. Richardson and Norgate (2015) argue that the correlation between IQ and job performance is, at best, greatly overestimated by the pro-IQ side (figures such as Ian Deary, Richard Haier, Arthur Jensen, and most notably in the job performance debate, Frank Schmidt and John Hunter) and at worst, entirely useless. Do their arguments hold up?

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New survey of the experts of intelligence research

Rindermann, Coyle, and Becker (2020) are releasing a new survey of the experts on controversial (or non-controversial) questions relating to intelligence. The questions were much fresher this time around and provide some interesting insight into the true beliefs of intelligence researchers. The results are discussed below:

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The Black Plague and European Intelligence

In this post, I want to detail some evidence as to how the ‘Black’ plague or bubonic plague caused a change in European genetic makeup, particularly that concerning intelligence. A few years ago, a study made mainstream news showing that Europeans have less susceptibility to HIV, and generally have stronger immune systems than before, because of the black plague (Laayouni et al., 2014). Now, that finding is not actually the focus of this post, but it allows the ideas within the post to become more realistic.

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About that Mani et al. study

I regularly see this study thrown around from Mani et al. (2013) titled “Poverty impedes cognitive function”. It should be no surprise. In just a few years, it’s gathered over 1,400 citations and made multiple sources of mainstream news (see here, here and here for example). I see it all the time in debates about socioeconomic effects on IQ, despite the fact that it is, all around, a very bad study.

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